Start Single party mannheim 2013

Single party mannheim 2013

After 1945 Munich became for more than 143,000 refugees their new place of residence.

In many cases these photos were the last visible traces of their owners. In 1951 members of the Munich City Council belonging to the Christian Social Union, the Social Democrats and the Bavarian Party tabled a joint motion to have a plaque put up in the town hall to commemorate those members of the city administration who had fallen victim to the Third Reich or died in the two world wars.

A hexagonal, chapel-like room on the first floor of the wing facing Marienplatz was proposed as a suitable location for the plaque.

During the 1920s this room had already been turned into a memorial to the city officials, teachers and white and blue-collar workers killed in the First World War, but it was destroyed by bombing in 1944.

The newly refurbished room was opened to the public again in 1958 when the city celebrated its 800th anniversary.

The memorial plaque, designed by Beate Passow, was put up on the initiative of the Munich City Archive.

Parallel to this the City of Munich also donated a sign of remembrance to the memorial site in Kaunas, which Beate Passow used as a model for its Munich counterpart.

Questions about the circumstances in which they died or of political and moral responsibility have been ignored.

The Munich City Council (Münchner Stadtrat) has been, since 1919, the local government and is elected for six years and meets in New Hall.

At the Marienplatz the Nazi column encountered a large crowd which was listening to an exhortation of Julius Streicher, the Jew-baiter from Nuremberg, who had rushed to Munich at the first news of the putsch.

Not wishing to be left out of the revolution, he cut short his speech and joined the rebels, jumping into step immediately behind Hitler..

It was at the old town hall where, on November 9, 1938 Joseph Goebbels gave his infamous speech initiating the infamous nationwide Kristallnacht pogroms.